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'Once in a lifetime ' experience: Lighthouse keeper on Lake Superior
CBC News (5/19)
A group is hiring two students to serve as lighthouse keepers this summer on Porphyry Island, about 40 kilometers east of Thunder Bay, Ont.

Superior students set sail for hands-on learning about St. Louis River, Lake Superior
Wisconsin Public Radio (5/16)
Close to 1,500 students from northern Minnesota and Wisconsin set sail for a day on St. Louis River to learn about the Great Lakes, as part of the week-long St. Louis River Quest.

Tree group aims to ‘ReLeaf’ Michigan
WKAR - East Lansing, MI (5/10)
An Ann Arbor-based organization has been planting trees all over Michigan since 1988. ReLeaf Michigan helps property owners learn about trees and how to plant them, citing their numerous benefits.

Coldwater bacteria threatens Great Lakes salmon
Charlevoix Courier (5/3)
A new study shows a bacterial disease that sickens fish whether raised in captivity or in the wild is imperiling popular salmon species in the Great Lakes Basin.

TEACH Calendar of Events
What's going on in your neighborhood this month? Meet other people and learn together at recreational and educational events! Our new dynamic calendar is updated daily with current educational events.
Great Lakes native flora

6 | Native flora fun facts!

Click for larger image. State & Provincial Trees
Illinois: white oak (Quercus alba)
Indiana: yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera)
Michigan: eastern white pine (Pinus strobus)
Minnesota: red pine (Pinus resinosa)
New York: sugar maple (Acer saccharum)
Ohio: Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra)
Ontario: eastern white pine (Pinus strobus)
Pennsylvania: eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)
Québec: yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis)
Wisconsin: sugar maple (Acer saccharum)

Click for larger image. State & Provincial Flowers
Illinois: native violet (Viola sororia)
Indiana: peony (Paeonia spp.)
Michigan: apple blossom (Pyrus coronaria)
Minnesota: lady slipper (Cypripedium reginae)
New York: rose (Rosa spp.)
Ohio: scarlet carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)
Ontario: white trillium (Trillium L.)
Pennsylvania: mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia)
Québec: white lily (Lilium candidum)*
Wisconsin: wood violet (Viola sororia)

*not a native plant
Reference: Geobop's Symbols

Sassafras fall color Why do leaves change color in the autumn?

Why do plants have a common name and a Latin name?
Carl von Linne created scientific names for plants, or botanical nomenclature, in order for scientists and plants lover all over the world to be able to identify the same plant with the same name. Von Linne's Latin names for plants often include a noun, the generic name, and an adjective, the specific name. The first name is the generic name, and states the genus to which the plant belongs; the second name, called the specific name, describes the species of the plant. The generic name is always capitalized and italized, and often honors the person who found the plant, or relates to mythology or description. The specific name is italized and usually lowercase, and provides a good clue to the plant's look or character.
Reference: Iowa State University Horticulture & Home Pest News

Some examples:
Quercus alba (white oak): Quercus means strong, and alba means white.
Pinus resinosa (red pine): Pinus means pine, and resinosa means resinous (translucent and sticky plant secretion)

Go to the Glossary of Roots of Botanical Names to read more!


Graphics: yellow poplar (credit: USDA PLANTS database); lady's slipper (credit: Raphael Carter); Sassafras fall color

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