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Re: consultant role in mandatory p2 planning



HI Kathy,
The only work that comes to mind is some research showing that
companies who involve employees in P2 are more successful at reducing
releases. There is a Cornell professor (Rosenthal?Cohen and Rosenthal?)
in their Industrial and Labor Relations school who analyzed TRI data to
show this, and I know there are similar studies that I can't think of
right now.
I would also encourage you to train them to use their own inventory
data, which typically needs to be gathered by company staff, in looking
for P2 opportunities (doing a mini materials accounting).
Good luck,
Melinda Dower
NJDEP
(609) 292-1122

>>> "Kathy Barwick" <KBarwick@dtsc.ca.gov> 05/19/04 02:25PM >>>
Hi all. I am preparing training for consultants that prepare
California's mandatory hazardous waste source reduction plans. Besides
focusing on the technical requirements, I want to include material
that
addresses the appropriate role for an outside consulting, including
their role as facilitator (e.g., including teams of company staff) and
discourage template approaches and off-site hands-off approaches that
may not take advantage of company staff expertise, reduce ownership at
the staff level, etc. 
 
Can anyone direct me to materials that discuss these issues? I
searched
the Mass TUR site for such materials but so far have not found what
I'm
looking for.
 
Thanks VERY much.
 
Kathy Barwick
Sacramento Region Pollution 
    Prevention Coordinator
Dept. of Toxic Substances Control
(916) 255-6421
fax (916) 255-3595


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